Setting up your MTD Kingston bass

by Michael Tobias

 

Optimal set up is individual but I generally use the low B or E as a straight edge, holding it down at the 1st and 16th fret and adjusting the truss rod until there is about .010 - .015 space between the top of the 8th fret and the bottom of the string.

Then I adjust the high string so that it is 1/16 (2/32, 1.5mm) from the top of the last fret. I check for buzzing...if that is good then I adjust the rest of the strings following the curvature of the fingerboard and moving them up slightly until the low B is at 3/32 or about 2.5 mm.

The rest depends on your technique and attack. If you have a lighter touch you can get away with a lower action if you want. If you have a harder attack you will need to raise the action to keep the strings from buzzing.

Pick up heights are generally set by holding down the outside strings at the 24th fret and raising or lowering the bridge pick up to about 3/16 under the strings, top parallel to the strings when loose. Then I use the blend pot to raise or lower the neck pick up to match the output.

Buzz Feiten Tuning System Instructions

These tuning instructions are only applicable to MTD basses that include the Buzz FeitenTuning System. Luckily, all MTD Kingston basses come with the zero fret installed. These tuning instructions are only applicable to electronic tuners that include the Buzz Feiten Tuning System. Currently, this includes Peterson Tuners, starting with the VSI up to all current models; Planet Waves Tru-Strobe Tuners with Buzz Feiten
Tuning System; and Korg DT-7. With one of these tuners you can do the following:

When I string a bass or guitar with new strings, I usually stretch them for a bit before doing BFTS intonation…..play for about ½ hour or put them on and leave them overnight. Make sure the neck is set like you want and that the action is also set the way you like it. Tune the bass to pitch using the tuner.

Match the:

F string open at pitch against the F at the 12th fret 1 cent flat
C string open at pitch against the C at the 12th fret 1 cent flat
G string open at pitch against the G at the 12th fret 1 cent flat
D string open at pitch against the D at the 12th fret 1 cent flat
A string open at pitch against the A at the 12th fret 1 cent sharp
E string open at pitch against the B at the 7th fret 1 cent sharp
B string open at pitch against the F# at the 7th fret 1 cent sharp

If the note is sharp, that means the saddle is too close to the 12th fret, if it is flat then it is too far away.